Beef recipes-Beef & Konjak Miso Nikomi Stew


Introducing one of my favorite beef dishes! In Japan, we have dish called “Gyu-suji Nikomi” It’s a stew with beef tendons cooked until extremely tender so you can break apart with chop sticks. I just love this type of meaty dish to go with a bowl of steamed rice! It also contents lots of vegetables including konjack. Every item is very well cooked through and has full of taste absorbed in side…To make a perfect Nikomi, there are lots of processing required. But a moment you have a bite of meat, you will know it’s all worth it!

[ Ingredients ] *tsp=tea spoon tbs=table spoon
~ serves four ~
500g Beef finger ribs
120g Burdock root
250g Konjak
400g Daikon
4~5 stalks Green onion
20g Ginger
2~3 cloves Garlic
2 tbs Sugar
100cc Sake
3 tbs Soy sauce
3 tbs Miso
2 tbs Mirin

POINT-ENG

*to see Japanese seasonings explanations please click here!

 

 

 

[ Directions ]

1-
1. This time I’m using beef finger ribs.
POINT-ENG

You can any part of meat that are suitable for stew!

 

 

2-
2. Cut into about 5~6cm length.

2-
3. To remove sanguinariness, you can blanch the meat. Put into boiling water and cook until the meat surface turns the color.
POINT-ENG

On this step, the meat doesn’t need to be cooked through.  Just need to wash off the impurities around the meat.

 

 

2-
4. Remove from the pot and rinse well under running water.

2-
5. Now get to the vegetables,, Lightly scrape off the burdock root skin.
POINT-ENG

The skin contents lots of flavor and nutrition. Try not to remove too much!

 

 

2-
6. Cut into half…

2-
7. And then lightly pound them to make some cracks.
POINT-ENG

Having cracks makes much easier to penetrate the seasonings.

 

 

2-
8. Cut them diagonally.

2-
9. Soak into water to prevent from discoloration.
POINT-ENG

You don’t particularly add vinegar or salt. Acid can easily destroy the nutrition.

 

 

2-
10. Cut a carrot into small triangles.

2-
11. Cut green onions into 4~5cm length.

2-
12. Slice a ginger.

2-
13. To loosen up garlic skin, you can pound them with the side of the knife.

2-
14. Now you can remove the skin very easily!

2-
15. To process daikon, first off, cut into 2~2.5cm thick. And curve off the layer of fiber underneath the skin.
POINT-ENG

There’s thick sturdy fiber lying underneath the skin. If you don’t remove this, it’ll ruin the texture of stewed daikon!!

 

 

2-
16. And cut into fan shapes

2-
17. You can also round off the every corner with petty knife or peeler.
POINT-ENG

This is called “Men-tori” During the stewing process, soft root vegetables such as daikon, potato, will bump each other and start dissolving from the edgy corner. Many Japanese stew dishes also known as “Nimono” include this shaving process.

 

 

2-
18. Add daikon into a pot filled with plenty of water and start heating. Cook until soft.
POINT-ENG

Q. How do you decide start from cold water or boiling water?
A. The easiest way would be…seeing where or/and how the vegetables are grown. If grown in soil such as potato, carrot, burdock root, most of the root vegetables are suitable starting with cold water. A slow cooking method will work effectively. If grown ON or ABOVE soil, such as green beans, leaves, most of the green vegetables are suitable starting with boiling water. Of course there are some exceptions.
It’s just one quick way to tell if you are not too sure..( ´ ▽ ` )ノ

 

 

2-
19. When it’s soft, you can remove from the pot and rinse every pieces to wash off the bitterness came out and left on the surface.
POINT-ENG

Parboiled daikon can absorb the seasonings more effectively without holding any unwanted bitterness!

 

 

2-
20. Tear a konjak into small pieces by hands

1-
21. Or you can use a spoon to scoop…
POINT-ENG

Creating lots of bumpy surface by tearing can catch lots of flavor. Make sure NOT to use a knife!

 

 

2-
22. Toss them into boiling water and cook for about 2~3 minutes.

2-
23. Remove from the pot and wash off all the musty smell.

2-
24. Now you can finally start stewing!! Add the processed beef, ginger, garlic and green onion into a stew pot.
POINT-ENG

I separate the ingredients into two groups. Start with the hardest item such as beef finger ribs with some “mirepoix” or aromatic vegetables.

 

 

2-
25. Add sake, sugar and water.
POINT-ENG

Don’t need to measure water, just add enough to cover up the meat.

 

 

2-
26. Bring it to a boil, remove the scum on the surface as much as you can..

2-
27. Turn to low heat, keep simmering for about half-hour.

2-
28. And then add the rest of the vegetables including the konjak.

2-
29. Add some more water to cover up all the ingredients.

2-
30. You can also add soy sauce. Simmer it for another 45minutes or so.
POINT-ENG

Miso has delicate fragrance. To fully enjoy miso aroma, it should be added just before the final cooking process.

 

 

1-
31. It’s been about 45 minutes and all the ingredients seem to be soften. If not, continue simmering…
POINT-ENG

After adding miso, you don’t want to cook too long. Make sure your food’s been cooked the way you like!

 

 

2-
32. Now you can prepare miso. Combine the miso with a little bit of the soup from the pot.

2-
33. Mix well, make sure the miso are all dissolved.
POINT-ENG

If you add miso directly into the pot, it may not be completely dissolved and stay lumpy..

 

 

2-
34. Pour the liquefied miso into the pot.

2-
35. And also Mirin. Simmer for about 10 minutes.
POINT-ENG

Mirin is not just for adding sweetness, also to give an attractive glossy appearance!

 

 

2-
36. You should end up with nice and shiny beef stew. You can now shut off the stove!
POINT-ENG

If you still have time, you can let it cool down “before” serving. This way all the flavor can be absorbed into all the ingredients. When it comes to the serving time, reheat it. You can sprinkle some chopped green onion and nanami/chili powder.

POINT-ENG

This type of dish is also suitable storing in the freezer. It can last for a month or two. Make a big batch of it and pack into each serving, you can enjoy any time you want to!!

 

 

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